Monthly Archives: February 2014

First couple weeks in Chiang Mai

Out of one hotel and into another. The hotel that the tour agency booked for me for the first two days in Chiang Mai was just outside the mote, north of the old city. There were street food carts right outside every evening and a shopping mall about half a mile to the west. It was fairly quiet there, which I would come to appreciate later. Double-decker tour buses are fairly common; this one was parked outside the hotel for the two days I was there.

Double-decker tour bus

Double-decker tour bus

I would be spending the next two weeks in a new hotel that I had reserved in Chiang Mai more then a month ago. It is about a quarter mile south of the old city and within walking distance to many things. The staff at the new hotel was absolutely fantastic. Cheery, smiling and happy to help with directions and even made an effort to teach me some Thai phrases. Breakfast, lunch or dinner was available from 7 AM to 7 PM and laundry was 50 baht (or was it 60?, about $2.00) per kilogram, and ready the following evening.

Hotel room south of the old city

Hotel room south of the old city

Desk, small fridge, coat rack in hotel room

Vanity, small fridge, coat rack in hotel room

This room had the same power control device near the door that the other hotels had. Inserting the key fob turns on power to the room and removing it turns it off. The one difference here was that the refrigerator also gets turned off with the rest of the room’s power. I liked to have the power on while I was gone to charge my computer tablet, camera battery, or phone and in the other hotels, I plugged the chargers into the fridge outlet. I did eventually find a work-around that kept the fridge powered up and let me charge my devices.

This hotel was in a more exciting location and it was only $23 per night. One of the two weekend markets in Chiang Mai was only 100 feet or so from the hotel. The Saturday Walking Street Market draws crowds of tourists and Thais alike, though mostly tourists I’d say. There’re vendors selling everything from food to jewelry, clothes to art.

Saturday Walking street market, Wua Lai Rd

Saturday Walking street market, Wua Lai Rd

The police close off the road to vehicle traffic mid to late afternoon as the vendors come in and set up their stands. The market is about a kilometer long (almost 3/4 of a mile), and branches off slightly down side alleys, and into parking lots.

My room at the hotel was right on the street, so traffic was a bit noisy, especially in the mornings. There was also a loudspeaker on the utility pole 10 feet from my balcony, and about once a week or so the monks would say prayers to the people over this PA system… Starting at 7:45 AM and continuing for hours.

Loudspeakers used by the monks for prayers

Loudspeakers used by the monks for prayers

It actually only took four to five days to get used to the new environment and then I had no trouble sleeping through the night with only the occasional loud noise pulling me from slumber.

The “Old City” was surrounded by a huge brick wall long ago. Most of the wall is gone, but the four corners and several gates (or gateways) have been preserved and rebuilt over the years. This new hotel is near Chiang Mai Gate where there is a daily farmer’s type market as well as food carts set up every evening.

A rickshaw outside Chiang Mai gate

A rickshaw outside Chiang Mai gate

 

Food cart vendor at Chiang Mai Gate in the evening

Food cart vendor at Chiang Mai Gate in the evening, all meals 35 baht.

One of the corner sections of the old wall by the mote

One of the corner sections of the old wall by the mote

I spend a good bit of my time out riding around, exploring, and looking for new places to eat. About a half mile or so outside the old city to the southeast I found an american style restaurant called Butter is Better. Most breakfast entrees that you’d find in any american diner could be had here. I opted for Eggs Florentine and coffee.

Eggs Benedict at Butter is Better

Eggs Florentine at Butter is Better

I venture back there for breakfast once a week or so, though I’m still looking for a place that makes great huevos rancheros.

While I’m on the subject of food, I’ll share this photo I took of a sign at a 7 Eleven; a Ham Burger.

Triple cheese hamburger at 7 Eleven, Chiang Mai

Triple cheese ham burger at 7 Eleven, Chiang Mai

It has long been Thai tradition to leave your shoes at the door when entering a home, or most definitely a Temple. Some places you leave your shoes on, others you take them off. The best way to know what to do is to look to see if there’re shoes outside the door where your entering. At my hotel… it was a shoes off policy. I had no problem with this, but it quickly got me thinking about buying some flip-flops or sandals like the Thais wear.

Leave your shoes at the door please. Notice, mostly flip-flops.

Leave your shoes at the door please. Notice, mostly flip-flops.

Another place I went to was a shopping mall, southwest of the old city, near the airport. I’ve mentioned before that motorbikes are the most popular transportation here, and this photo will help to make the point…

A motorbike parking lot at the mall near the airport, Chiang Mai.

A motorbike parking lot at the mall near the airport, Chiang Mai.

This was one of at least two parking lots for motorbikes. I parked in another one just as big. There is separate parking for cars, but I’d say that the scooters easily outnumber the cars by two to one or more.

Well that’s about it for now. I’ll leave you with a couple photos of Temples that are just amazing with their gold, silver, brilliant colors, and dragons…

 

A Silver Temple near the hotel

A Silver Temple near the hotel

A Temple south of Chiang Mai in Lamphun, if I remember correctly.

A Temple south of Chiang Mai in Lamphun, if I remember correctly.

Temple in Lamphun

Temple in Lamphun

There be dragons here.

There be dragons here.

 

Around Chiang Mai

The new hotel room isn’t quite as nice as my last one, but it’s clean and comfortable. Again, there’s a device near the door that controls the electrical power to the room. The power comes on when the large rectangular key fob is inserted into it.

Hotel room in Chiang Mai

Hotel room in Chiang Mai

An interesting difference with the bedding here in Thailand, is that they don’t use a top sheet, only a bottom sheet and a comforter. I don’t really miss the additional sheet too much, but sometimes it’s nice to have a cover somewhere between a comforter and nothing.

I have rented a motorbike; it’s a 125 cc Honda Click scooter. Top speed is governed at 90 kph (56 mph) at wide open throttle. That’s not a problem around town, but can feel a bit slow on the super-highway. The first day’s rent was 250 baht ($7.80). I opted to keep the bike for a week and the price dropped to 220 baht. At the end of that week, I opted for a monthly rental package finalized at 3000 baht ($94 or about $3.15 per day), playing one rental company against another.

The 125cc Honda Click I rented, in front of one of the many Temples.

The 125cc Honda Click I rented, in front of one of the many Temples.

The bike has a 2 liter gas tank and filling it up costs about 65 baht ($2.00). This lasts me nearly two days of zipping around town, sightseeing, shopping, and running errands.

Gas station in Thailand - about $4.50 per gallon, Jan 2014

Gas station in Thailand, prices are baht per liter – about $4.50 per gallon (US), Jan 2014

There are many,many temples here in Chiang Mai, and all around Thailand for that matter. I haven’t started to venture out to look at them yet, but I snap the occasional photo now and then, as I pass by.

One of the many Temples in Chiang Mai

One of the many Temples in Chiang Mai

The “old city” is a nearly perfect one mile by one mile square within Chiang Mai. Also in a square shape, are two ring roads separated by a moat, around the perimeter. The outer road’s traffic runs clockwise and the inner runs counter clockwise. There are at least 16 bridges that cross the moat as you travel around the ring roads, so switching direction is pretty easy. There are many fountains in the moat that make for a very pleasant scene as you wander along water’s edge. The water appears as unspoiled as a mountain stream due to renovations of the moat started in 1992 that included filtration, as well as the fountains.

The mote around Chiang Mai has many fountains

The moat around Chiang Mai has many fountains

It’s not uncommon to see workers around the city keeping it free of litter. I often find it difficult to find a trash can for an empty cup, or skewer left from a tasty food-cart snack, but I almost never see trash on the street in any quantity. I have discovered that the 7 Eleven convenience stores always have trash cans out front, and there almost everywhere.

Caption here

A city employee working to keep the moat area neat and tidy

I’m finding that I don’t have as much free time for blogging as I thought I would. I’ll keep posting, but probably at a slower rate.

I seem to have lots to do, and I was once told, when you have lots to do, get your golf game taken care of first.